A friend recently asked me what methods I use to find subdomains. To be honest I was confused, like “oooohhh so much, brute force mmm… zone transfer and… brute for… wait Google and mmm… many other tools!” What a shame that I was so inaccurate after so much time spent to look for subdomains. Time to dig a little bit! After I wrote a list of the most popular methods, I tried to make a list of some tools and online resources to exploit them. Of course this list is far from exhaustive, there are many new stuff every day, but it’s still a good start :)

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People are usually surprised by the answer when they ask me what I do for living, questions rain, here are some answers. My first report was a XSS on a Yahoo acquisition, it happened the 26th January 2016. Since this date, I (try to) perform Bug Bounty as a full time job on Hackerone. Did I say “job”? I don’t really consider bug bounty/hacking as a “job”, it’s more a hobby or a passion, because you have to be passionnate to perform in this domain. So let’s say that bug bounty is my main source of income. Below why I do this “job”, why it fits perfectly to me and why I love it.

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This is a real story or not, that occured in mid 2017 or not, about a private program or not, on Hackerone or not, believe me or not, but it changed my life. I would like to thanks all the people from this company I talked with. They were very nice with me, very fast to fix the bugs and I always got the rewards in less than 7 days, frequently the day of the report, even for the smallest bugs. Thanks to them, I wish we could find more program like this one.

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There is different ways to hunt for vulnerabilities, depending of your knowledge, your skills, your expectation and how you like to chase. I personally love programming and, as a true developper, I’m lazy, so I love to automate things. By writing some piece of code or by combining multiple tools, you can find a lot of interesting stuff. This article is about some scripts/tricks I wrote/use to perform massive tests:

  • XSS with PhantomJS
  • Heroku subdomain takeover
  • Amazon S3 buckets theft
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Hackerone recently released a CTF created by Jobert Abma. Even if I didn’t complete the challenge, it was so exciting and I was so close from the solution that I wanted to share a writeup. Here is the tweet that tiggered the war:

“Hackers, hack your way to NYC this December for h1-212! An engineer of http://acme.org launched a new server for a new admin panel. He is completely confident that the server can’t be hacked, so he hid a flag. Details: https://www.hackerone.com/blog/hack-your-way-to-nyc-this-december-for-h1-212 …. #TogetherWeHitHarder”

And here is the full description:

“An engineer of acme.org launched a new server for a new admin panel at http://104.236.20.43/. He is completely confident that the server can’t be hacked. He added a tripwire that notifies him when the flag file is read. He also noticed that the default Apache page is still there, but according to him that’s intentional and doesn’t hurt anyone. Your goal? Read the flag!”

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